On your death your pension entitlement stops immediately, so it's important your spouse or someone else in your family informs us immediately.

Your husband, wife or civil partner and any qualifying children may then receive a pension which increases in line with the cost of living if s/he is entitled to one under the LGPS regulations.

If you were an active member after 31 March 2009 and are not married or are not in a civil partnership, but have:

  • Lived with someone for 2 years at the time of your death
  • Whilst both of you have been free to marry
  • Whilst you have been financially interdependent

a cohabiting partner can receive a survivors pension provided s/he meets the criteria under the LGPS regulations.

Short-term widow's, widower's, or civil partner's pension

If you left service before 1 April 2009, for three months after your death (six if there are any eligible children in the care of your husband, wife or civil partner), your spouse will receive a pension of the same amount as you were receiving from your pension. The situation is slightly different for husbands and civil partners.

Long-term widow's, widower's, nominated cohabiting partner's or civil partner's pension

After the short-term pension ends or if you were in service on or after 1 April 2009, your spouse will receive a pension which increases with the cost of living for the rest of their life, even if they re-marry. This will be based 1/160 of your final pay times your eligible service (or pay for service after 31 March 2015). The situation is slightly different for husbands, cohabiting / civil partners or if you married after you retired.

Short-term qualifying children's pension

Children's pensions are usually payable after your widow's, widower's or civil partner's short-term pension has finished. If your children are not in the care of your partner, your children also get a short-term pension equal to your pension for three months after you die.

If there is no widow's, widower's or civil partner's pension to be paid, a children's short-term pension lasts six months.
Children's pensions are shared among your children.

Long-term qualifying children's pension

Your children may receive a long-term pension for as long as they are eligible (under 17, or up to 23 and in full-time education which started before they were 17, or aged over 16 and disabled within the meaning off the Equality Act 2010).  The amount depends on a number of factors, including how many children you have, whether they are in the care of your husband, wife, or civil partner, and if your child is receiving any pay while in full-time training.